Braille Trails Make Hiking For Visually Impaired People Easy

With these types of assistance, visually impaired people can not only enjoy nature in a relaxed and independent manner but do so without feeling any anxiety about what’s coming ahead.

A group of people seen hiking on a Braille trail. They are holding a rope that guides them on the trail.

People with visual impairment have very limited access to the outdoors, especially when it comes to activities like hiking. Hiking trails typically are uneven and sometimes treacherous, proving to be unsafe. In addition, blind people are unable to read signage available because they are usually not accessible.

To overcome such challenges, Evan Barnard founded Nature for All, an organization that makes trails accessible for blind people. “Braille trails” provide guided ropes and signage braille so a visually impaired person could walk along unassisted and enjoy sensory experiences as well as they walk along, such as touching trees, feeling texture of leaves and barks of trees etc.

With these types of assistance, visually impaired people can not only enjoy nature in a relaxed and independent manner but do so without feeling any anxiety about what’s coming ahead.

Nature for All maintains a directory of Braille trails and sensory gardens in the US and around the world. See if there’s one in your area!

Does this give you ideas on how you can make trails, gardens and parks accessible in your local communities? Share your thoughts below!

Website: http://www.naturefortheblind.com

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